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Molybdenum

Molybdenum

Uses

Molybdenum is an essential trace mineral needed for the proper function of certain enzyme-dependent processes, including the metabolism of iron .

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Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Asthma
Refer to label instructions
The trace mineral molybdenum helps the body detoxify sulfites, which can trigger asthma attacks.

In some people with asthma, symptoms can be triggered by ingestion of food additives known as sulfites. Pretreatment with a large amount of vitamin B12 (1,500 mcg orally) reduced the asthmatic reaction to sulfites in children with sulfite sensitivity in one preliminary trial.1 The trace mineral molybdenum also helps the body detoxify sulfites.2 While some doctors use molybdenum to treat selected patients with asthma, there is little published research on this treatment, and it is not known what an appropriate level of molybdenum supplementation would be. A typical American diet contains about 200 to 500 mcg per day,3 and preliminary short-term trials have used supplemental amounts of 500 mcg per day.4 People who suspect sulfite-sensitive asthma should consult with a physician before taking molybdenum.

How It Works

How to Use It

No recommended dietary allowance (RDA) has been established for molybdenum. The estimated range recommended by the Food and Nutrition Board as safe and adequate is 75–250 mcg per day for adults.

Where to Find It

The amount of molybdenum in plant foods varies significantly and is dependent upon the mineral content of the soil. The best sources of this mineral are beans, dark green leafy vegetables, and grains. Hard tap water can also supply molybdenum to the diet. Molybdeum is also available as a supplement.

Possible Deficiencies

Although molybdenum is an essential mineral, no deficiencies have been reported in humans.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

Molybdenum is needed to convert purine to uric acid, and excessive intake could, in rare cases, increase uric acid levels and potentially trigger gout . Molybdenum interferes with the absorption of copper; long-term supplementation with molybdenum could, in theory, result in copper deficiency. Molybdenum has been reported to cause psychosis in a patient taking 300 to 800 mcg per day for 18 days. This report is as yet unsubstantiated by any other human or animal research.5

References

1. Anibarro B, Caballero T, Garcia-Ara C, et al. Asthma with sulfite intolerance in children: A blocking study with cyanocobalamin. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1992;90:103-9.

2. Johnson JL, Wuebbens MM, Mandell R, Shih VE. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency in a patient previously characterized as deficient in sulfite oxidase. Biochem Med Metabol Biol 1988;40:86-93.

3. Sardesai VM. Molybdenum: an essential trace element. Nutr Clin Pract 1993;8:277-81.

4. Moss M. Effects of molybdenum on pain and general health: a pilot study. J Nutr Environ Med 1995;5:55-61.

5. Momcilovic B. A case report of acute human molybdenum toxicity from a dietary molybdenum supplement—a new member of the “Lucor metallicum” family. Arh Hig Rada Toksikol 1999;50:289-97.

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