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Taurine

Taurine

Uses

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
3 Stars
Congestive Heart Failure
2 grams three times per day with a doctor's supervision
Taurine, an amino acid, helps increase the force and effectiveness of heart muscle contractions.

Taurine , an amino acid, helps increase the force and effectiveness of heart-muscle contractions. Research (some double-blind) has shown that taurine helps people with CHF.1 , 2 , 3 , 4 Most doctors suggest taking 2 grams three times per day.

2 Stars
Anemia and Iron Deficiency
1,000 mg daily at a different time from an additional iron supplement
Taurine has been shown, in a double-blind study, to improve the response to iron therapy in young women with iron-deficiency anemia.
Taurine has been shown, in a double-blind study, to improve the response to iron therapy in young women with iron-deficiency anemia.5 The amount of taurine used was 1,000 mg per day for 20 weeks, given in addition to iron therapy, but at a different time of the day. The mechanism by which taurine improves iron utilization is not known.
2 Stars
Cystic Fibrosis
30 mg per 2.2 lbs (1 kg) of body weight daily
Taurine is an amino acid and a component of bile acids, which are important for proper fat digestion. Supplementing with taurine may help improve fat digestion.

Taurine is an amino acid and a component of bile acids, which are important for proper fat digestion. Some,6 , 7 but not all,8 investigators have reported improvement in fat digestion among people with CF when they supplemented with 30 mg taurine per 2.2 pounds of body weight daily. Greater improvement was seen in people with the worst maldigestion.9

2 Stars
Iron-Deficiency Anemia
1,000 mg daily
Taurine has been shown to improve the response to iron therapy in young women with iron-deficiency anemia.

Taurine has been shown, in a double-blind study, to improve the response to iron therapy in young women with iron-deficiency anemia.10 The amount of taurine used was 1,000 mg per day for 20 weeks, given in addition to iron therapy, but at a different time of the day. The mechanism by which taurine improves iron utilization is not known.

2 Stars
Pre- and Post-Surgery Health
Take at least 1.5 grams daily before and after surgery
Taurine is an amino acid that appears to have an important role in immune cell functions. Supplementing with it may reduce inflammation.

Taurine is an amino acid abundantly present in the body that also appears to have an important role in immune cell functions.11 A preliminary trial found that patients receiving an oral formula enriched with taurine (1 gram per liter) beginning two days before surgery and continuing until five days after surgery had less inflammation after surgery compared with those receiving a standard formula.12

1 Star
Cardiomyopathy
Refer to label instructions
Taurine has been shown in preliminary studies to be beneficial for cardiomyopathy.

Several veterinary studies have demonstrated benefits from supplementation with taurine , another amino acid, in animals with cardiomyopathy. Most of these studies showed taurine deficiency to be a cause of cardiomyopathy. Taurine supplementation in animals with DCM has resulted in improvement of symptoms and survival rates.13 , 14 However, clinical studies in humans are lacking; thus, despite a good safety record, the benefits of taurine supplementation in people with any form of cardiomyopathy remain speculative. When taurine supplements are used by doctors to treat people with other conditions, 2 grams taken three times per day for a total of 6 grams per day is often recommended.

1 Star
Epilepsy
Refer to label instructions
Taurine, an amino acid that is thought to play a role in the brain’s electrical activity, appears to temporarily reduce epileptic seizures in some people.

Taurine is an amino acid that is thought to play a role in the electrical activity of the brain; deficits of taurine in the brain have been associated with some types of epilepsy. However, while some short-term studies have suggested that taurine supplementation may reduce epileptic seizures in some people, the effect appears to be only temporary.15

1 Star
Hypertension
Refer to label instructions
Research has found that supplementing with taurine lowers blood pressure in people, possibly by reducing levels of the hormone epinephrine (adrenaline).

A deficiency of the amino acid taurine , is thought by some researchers to play an important role in elevating blood pressure in people with hypertension.16 Limited research has found that supplementation with taurine lowers blood pressure in animals17 and in people (at 6 grams per day),18 possibly by reducing levels of the hormone epinephrine (adrenaline).

1 Star
Type 1 Diabetes
Refer to label instructions
People with type 1 diabetes tend to have low taurine levels, a condition that increases the risk of heart disease. Supplementing with taurine may restore levels.
Taurine is an amino acid found in protein-rich food. People with type 1 diabetes have been reported to have low blood taurine levels, a condition that increases the risk of heart disease by altering blood viscosity. Supplementing with taurine (1.5 grams per day) has restored blood taurine to normal levels and corrected the problem of blood viscosity within three months.19
1 Star
Type 2 Diabetes
Refer to label instructions
Supplementing with taurine may affect insulin secretion and action, and may help protect the eyes and nerves from diabetic complications.
Animal studies have shown that supplementing with taurine, an amino acid found in protein-rich food, may affect insulin secretion and action, and may have potential in protecting the eyes and nerves from diabetic complications.20 However, a double-blind trial found no effect on insulin secretion or sensitivity when men with high risk for developing diabetes were given 1.5 grams per day of taurine for eight weeks.21 In another double-blind trial, taurine supplementation (2 grams per day for 12 months) failed to improve kidney complications associated with type 2 diabetes.22

How It Works

How to Use It

For the treatment of various medical conditions, doctors typically recommend 1.5 grams to as much as 6 grams or more per day.

Where to Find It

Taurine is found mostly in meat and fish. Except for infants, the human body is able to make taurine from cysteine —another amino acid .

Possible Deficiencies

Most people, including vegans (vegetarians who eat no dairy or eggs), do not need taurine supplements. While infants require taurine, the amount in either human milk or formula is adequate. People with diabetes have been reported to have lower blood levels of taurine than non-diabetics.23

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

Certain medicines interact with this supplement.

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • Busulfan

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.24 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Capecitabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.25 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Carboplatin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.26 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Carmustine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.27 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Chlorambucil

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.28 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Cisplatin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.29 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Cladribine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.30 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Cyclophosphamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.31 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Cytarabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.32 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Docetaxel

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.33 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Erlotinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.34 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Etoposide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.35 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Floxuridine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.36 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Fludarabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.37 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Fluorouracil

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.38 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Hydroxyurea

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.39 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Ifosfamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.40 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Irinotecan

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.41 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Lomustine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.42 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Mechlorethamine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.43 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Melphalan

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.44 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Mercaptopurine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.45 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Methotrexate

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.46 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Paclitaxel

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.47 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.48 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Thioguanine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.49 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Thiotepa

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.50 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Uracil Mustard

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.51 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Vinblastine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.52 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Vincristine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy.53 It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • none

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

  • none

Explanation Required

  • none

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Azuma J, Sawamura A, Awata N, et al. Double-blind randomized crossover trial of taurine in congestive heart failure. Curr Ther Res 1983;34(4):543–57.

2. Azuma J, Hasegawa H, Sawamura N, et al. Taurine for treatment of congestive heart failure. Int J Cardiol 1982;2:303–4.

3. Azuma J, Hasegawa H, Sawamura A, et al. Therapy of congestive heart failure with orally administered taurine. Clin Ther 1983;5(4):398–408.

4. Azuma J, Takihara K, Awata N, et al. Taurine and failing heart: experimental and clinical aspects. Prog Clin Biol Res 1985;179:195–213.

5. Sirdah MM, El-Agouza IMA, Abu Shahla ANK. Possible ameliorative effect of taurine in the treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia in female university students of Gaza, Palestine. Eur J Haematol 2002;69:236–2.

6. Darling PB, Lepage G, Leroy C, et al. Effect of taurine supplements on fat absorption in cystic fibrosis. Pediatr Res 1985;19:578–82.

7. Belli DC, Levy E, Darling PB, et al. Taurine improves the absorption of a fat meal in patients with cystic fibrosis. Pediatrics 1987;80:517–23.

8. Thompson GN, Robb TA, Davidson GP. Taurine supplementation, fat absorption, and growth in cystic fibrosis. J Pediatr 1987;111:501–6.

9. Darling PB, Lepage G, Leroy C, et al. Effect of taurine supplements on fat absorption in cystic fibrosis. Pediatr Res 1985;19:578–82.

10. Sirdah MM, El-Agouza IMA, Abu Shahla ANK. Possible ameliorative effect of taurine in the treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia in female university students of Gaza, Palestine. Eur J Haematol 2002;69:236–2.

11. Redmond HP, Stapleton PP, Neary P, Bouchier-Hayes D. Immunonutrition: the role of taurine. Nutrition 1998;14:599–604 [review].

12. O’Flaherty L, Bouchier-Hayes DJ. Immunonutrition and surgical practice. Proc Nutr Soc 1999;58:831–7 [review].

13. Kittleson MD, Keene B, Pion PD, Loyer CG. Results of the multicenter spaniel trial (MUST): taurine- and carnitine-responsive dilated cardiomyopathy in American cocker spaniels with decreased plasma taurine concentration. J Vet Intern Med 1997;11:204–11.

14. Pion PD, Kittleson MD, Thomas WP, et al. Response of cats with dilated cardiomyopathy to taurine supplementation. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992;201:275–84.

15. Durelli L, Mutani R. The current status of taurine in epilepsy. Clin Neuropharmacol 1983;6:37–48.

16. Kohashi N, Katori R. Decrease of urinary taurine in essential hypertension. Jpn Heart J 1983;24:91–102.

17. Abe M, Shibata K, Matsuda T, Furukawa T. Inhibition of hypertension and salt intake by oral taurine treatment in hypertensive rats. Hypertension 1987;10:383–9.

18. Fujita T, Ando K, Noda H, et al. Effects of increased adrenomedullary activity and taurine in young patients with borderline hypertension. Circulation 1987;75:525–32.

19. Franconi F, Bennardini F, Mattana A, et al. Plasma and platelet taurine are reduced in subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: effects of taurine supplementation. Am J Clin Nutr 1995;61:1115–9.

20. Franconi F, Di Leo MA, Bennardini F, Ghirlanda G. Is taurine beneficial in reducing risk factors for diabetes mellitus? Neurochem Res 2004;29:143–50 [review].

21. Brons C, Spohr C, Storgaard H, et al. Effect of taurine treatment on insulin secretion and action, and on serum lipid levels in overweight men with a genetic predisposition for type II diabetes mellitus. Eur J Clin Nutr 2004;58:1239-47.

22. Nakamura T, Ushiyama C, Suzuki S, et al. Effects of taurine and vitamin E on microalbuminuria, plasma metalloproteinase-9, and serum type IV collagen concentrations in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Nephron 1999;83:361–2.

23. Franconi F, Bennardini F, Mattana A, et al. Plasma and platelet taurine are reduced in subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: effects of taurine supplementation. Am J Clin Nutr 1995;61:1115–9.

24. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

25. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

26. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

27. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

28. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

29. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

30. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

31. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

32. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

33. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

34. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

35. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

36. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

37. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

38. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

39. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

40. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

41. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

42. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

43. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

44. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

45. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

46. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

47. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

48. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

49. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

50. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

51. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

52. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

53. Desai TK, Maliakkal J, Kinzie JL, et al. Taurine deficiency after intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:708–11.

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